The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Evaluating the Benefits of Regional Electronic Marketplaces: Assessing the Quality of the REM Success Model  pp11-20

Denise E Gengatharen, Craig Standing

© Jan 2004 Volume 7 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 66

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Abstract

A number of regional Internet electronic marketplaces (REMs) have failed or are floundering, partly due to the lack of proper evaluation of their costs and benefits. This paper uses a conceptual REM Success Model to examine the costs and benefits of a REM in Western Australia. The model has been derived from an extension to the Updated DeLone & McClean IS Success Model. The findings from the case study indicate that the REM Success Model, which includes cognisance of SME‑profile and motivation of the market maker, allows up‑front identification of the costs and benefits to all stakeholders.

 

Keywords: E-Commerce, Regional Electronic Marketplaces, Small and Medium Enterprises, SMEs, Evaluation of Benefits, REM Success Model

 

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Journal Article

e‑Commerce Investments from an SME perspective: Costs, Benefits and Processes  pp45-56

Sandra Cohen, Georgila Kallirroi

© Nov 2006 Volume 9 Issue 2, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp45 - 104

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Abstract

The scope of this paper is to investigate whether SMEs take into consideration the cost dimensions (tangible and intangible, direct and indirect) and follow the investment appraisal techniques proposed in literature as relevant and suitable in relation to e‑commerce adoption. More specifically, we analyse the importance placed by the EC adopters on specific cost elements, types of budgets and investment appraisal techniques in relation to EC decision. Furthermore, we aim at understanding the reasons, both quantitative and qualitative, that drive SMEs to embark on such an investment. Our empirical evidence is based on the responses to questions found on a structured questionnaire answered by Greek firms that have already adopted EC. Our findings indicate that cost, in general, is not a major issue for Greek SMEs when deciding to implement EC, while the strategic benefits they aim at gaining from EC applications play a critical role in the adoption decision.

 

Keywords: e-commerce, IT investment, SMEs, IT costs, IT investment appraisal, Greece

 

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Journal Article

Outsourced Information Systems Failures in SMEs: a Multiple Case Study  pp73-82

Jan Devos, Hendrik Van Landeghem, Dirk Deschoolmeester

© Jun 2008 Volume 11 Issue 2, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp51 - 108

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Abstract

Since the 1980s, a number of frameworks have been proposed for understanding the concept of information system (IS) failure. Two approaches to IS failures seem particularly important: the concept of Expectation Failure and the concept of Termination Failure. We argue that there is an extra dimension to the problem that is not covered by those descriptive models, which we call the Outsourced IS Failure (OISF). To explain the OISF we draw on agency theory, which views the problems that occur in outsourced environments as the results of three factors: goal differences, risk behaviour differences and information asymmetry. Although the (positivistic) agency theory has already been used to describe phenomena of failure in IT relations there is still a lack of empirical evidence. This paper brings the results of the attempts of falsification of the agency theory in situations of OISF. A positivistic case study research was conducted based on multiple cases in SMEs. The choice for qualitative research is based on the accessibility of well documented secondary data in litigation files of failed IS projects. Eight cases of IS project failures subject to litigation were selected. We conclude that the agency theory has strong prediction and explanation power for OISF. However some adjustments are needed to the agency theory. The theory seems to work in two ways, opportunistic behaviour is also observed on the side of the principal. The findings indicate that lack of trust is a prominent determinant for failure.

 

Keywords: IS outsourcing, SMEs, IS failures, Principal Agent theory, Organisational and Personal Trust

 

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Journal Article

ICT Adoption and Use in UK SMEs: a Failure of Initiatives?  pp91-96

G. Harindranath, R. Dyerson, D. Barnes

© Jun 2008 Volume 11 Issue 2, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp51 - 108

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Abstract

In this paper, we explore some of the results from a survey of 378 small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) based in the southeast of England. The objective of this survey was to build a snapshot of the state of play of the information and communications technology (ICT) use by SMEs in economically significant sectors in this region. The sectors chosen were as follows: food processing, transport and logistics, media and internet services. More specifically, the survey was intended to answer the following questions: what types of ICT are in use by SMEs in this region, what prevents and facilitates the adoption and use of ICT amongst these firms, and where do SMEs acquire information on ICT related issues. Our survey suggests that most SMEs in the southeast of England are in general positively inclined towards adoption and use of ICT. However, this adoption and use of ICT is mainly focused on operational matters with few extensions into potential strategic use of such technologies in their business environments. SME ownermanagers perceive ICT to be often costly and complex and are wary of consultants and vendor organisations. We also discovered, somewhat surprisingly, that SMEs are largely unaware of existing policy instruments at the regional, national and European levels, designed to help them in their adoption and use of ICT.

 

Keywords: Information and communications technology, ICT, small and medium sized enterprises, SMEs, ICT adoption, ICT use, government policy

 

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Journal Article

Use and Impact of ICT on SMEs in Oman  pp171-184

Rafi Ashrafi, Muhammed Murtaza

© Nov 2008 Volume 11 Issue 3, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp109 - 212

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Abstract

This paper presents the results of an exploratory study carried out to learn about the use and impact of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) on Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs) in Oman. The study investigates ICT infrastructure, software used, driver for ICT investment, perceptions about business benefits of ICT and outsourcing trends of SMEs. The study provides an insight on the barriers for the adoption of ICT. Data on these aspects of ICT was collected from 51 SMEs through a survey instrument. The results of the study show that only a small number of SMEs in Oman are aware of the benefits of ICT adoption. The main driving forces for ICT investment are to provide better and faster customer service and to stay ahead of the competition. A majority of surveyed SMEs have reported a positive performance and other benefits by utilizing ICT in their businesses. Majority of SMEs outsource most of their ICT activities. Lack of internal capabilities, high cost of ICT and lack of information about suitable ICT solutions and implementation were some of the major barriers in adopting ICT. These findings are consistent with other studies e.g. (Harindranath et al 2008). There is a need for more focus and concerted efforts on increasing awareness among SMEs on the benefits of ICT adoption. The results of the study recognize the need for more training facilities in ICT for SMEs, measures to provide ICT products and services at an affordable cost, and availability of free professional advice and consulting at reasonable cost to SMEs. Our findings therefore have important implication for policy aimed at ICT adoption and use by SMEs. The findings of this research will provide a foundation for future research and will help policy makers in understanding the current state of affairs of the usage and impact of ICT on SMEs in Oman.

 

Keywords: Information and communication technologies, ICT, Small and Medium Sized Enterprises, SMEs, developing countries, Gulf Cooperative Council, GCC, Middle East, Oman

 

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Journal Article

IT Evaluation Frameworks — Do They Make a Valuable Contribution? A Critique of Some of the Classic Models for use by SMEs  pp57-64

Pat Costello, Andy Sloane, Rob Moreton

© Jan 2007 Volume 10 Issue 1, ECITE 2006 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

Given the plethora of frameworks and models available in this area, not all could be evaluated here. This paper takes seven popular frameworks and examines aspects of IT evaluation with particular emphasis on Small to Medium Enterprises (SMEs). The frameworks were selected from the most well known of IT evaluation research including Delone and McLean, 1992, Seddon et.al. 1999, Farbey et.al, 1999, Levy et.al., 1998. Most of the frameworks were developed for large organisations and therefore those chosen were evaluated for their applicability to the world of SMEs. These are categorised into four areas: people issues, technology focus, evolutionary position and management aspects. The conclusion is reached that the use of a multi‑framework is needed for all organisations. This presents severe difficulties in larger organisations, as the problems of communications can be a stumbling block to completing the evaluation. However, this paper proposes that SMEs may find it easier to take parts of 'tested' frameworks used by larger companies and apply them. The communication links within SMEs are neither as complex nor as highly developed as in large organisations that may make this an appropriate approach.

 

Keywords: IT evaluation, IT Value, SMEs, frameworks, models

 

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Journal Article

Investigating the Factors Inhibiting SMEs from Recognizing and Measuring Losses From Cyber Crime in South Africa  pp167-178

Gino Bougaardt, Michael Kyobe

© Sep 2011 Volume 14 Issue 2, ICIME 2011, Editor: Ken Grant, pp167 - 281

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Abstract

The level of cyber attacks on organisations has increased tremendously in recent years. When such attacks occur, organisations need to assess the damage and loss from this crime. While large organisations have the mechanisms to determine such losses, SMEs lack such capability and often ignore the need to implement effective information security measures (Kyobe, 2008; Altbeker, 2000; Upfold and Sewry, 2005). Consequently, their risk exposure to cyber threats and the losses they incur from these attacks are often high (Ngo, Zhou, Chonka and Singh, 2009). However, the current legislative requirements, costly legal liabilities for non‑compliance, and increasing pressure by stakeholders (e.g., lenders, business partners) on SMEs to comply with good practices suggest that SMEs cannot ignore security any longer. In order to ensure accountability and compliance with security requirements, it is imperative for SMEs to identify, account and report cyber incidents and losses resulting from cyber attacks. This study investigated the factors that inhibit SMEs from recognizing and measuring losses from cyber attacks in South Africa. A survey involving twenty organisations from different business sectors was conducted and the results indicate that victimisation, resulting from a lack of awareness of cyber‑crime has the greatest influence on SMEs ability to recognise and prepare losses from cyber attacks.

 

Keywords: cybercrime, recognition and measuring losses, SMEs, victimisation

 

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Journal Article

Exploring the Alignment of Organisational Goals with KM: Cases in Four Irish Software SMEs  pp26-37

Ciara Heavin, Frederic Adam

© Jun 2013 Volume 16 Issue 1, ECIME 2012, Editor: Dr. David Sammon and Dr. Tadhg Nagle, pp1 - 84

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Abstract

Abstract: In the anticipation of the knowledge economy and the organisational pursuit of knowing what we know modern organisations have endeavoured to achieve varying levels of KM. It has typically been larger organisations that have possessed the econ omies of scale i.e. the financial resources to pursue this strategy, where they perceive they will lose their market share if they do not follow the trend. Smaller organisations have not had the same luxury. Ironically however, it is smaller organisations that have successfully managed knowledge for centuries. However there remains an absence of empirical evidence that highlights how SMEs operationalise their approach to KM, particularly in the high‑technology sectors. In view of the current financial ins tability, never has it been more important to focus on the knowledge capabilities of software SMEs where managing organisational knowledge is essential to the continued success of an SME. Pursuing a qualitative analysis approach using multiple case studie s in four Irish software SMEs, this study identifies sources of knowledge and occurrences of knowledge activities (KAs) as a means of understanding the firms approach to knowledge management (KM) and how this may be closely aligned to the organisatio ns greater strategic objectives thus providing them with greater flexibility to deal with environmental uncertainty. At the level of the cases, it was evident that software SMEs leverage KAs to serve their knowledge transfer needs. Unexpectedly, the find ings from this study indicate that these software SMEs were not good at knowledge creation activity. This may be attributed to the nature of the SME where a small number of key players i.e. founder/manager/head of development assumed responsibility for th is type of activity. Fundamentally, these software SMEs choose to leverage knowledge and KAs in order to serve the greater needs of the firm such as the need to develop a new software product, improve their customer relationships or ensure their position as an important cog in a larger organisation.

 

Keywords: Keywords: knowledge, knowledge management, KM, small and medium sized enterprises, SMEs, knowledge activity, KA, software, alignment and KM capabilities

 

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