The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Stock Price Reaction to Investments in Information Technology: the Relevance of Cost Management Systems  pp27-30

Narcyz Roztocki, Heinz Roland Weistroffer

© Apr 2006 Volume 9 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 43

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Abstract

The identification of conditions and factors under which investments in Information Technology (IT) can be expected to yield tangible returns is the subject of many productivity studies. Event study methodology, which examines the reaction in the stock price to announcements of different types of IT investments, is one approach to this kind of research. In the research presented in this paper, we use event study methodology to investigate the effect of cost management systems on payoffs from IT investments. The motivation for our research is based on the assumption that companies possessing reliable cost management systems, such as Activity‑Based Costing (ABC), are less likely to make expensive mistakes when investing in IT. Furthermore, the companies that use ABC and thus know the costs of their operation, are better able to single out those IT projects which positively impact the bottom line and competitiveness. In our study, we use a sample of three companies that are adopters of ABC, to examine the impact of 81 IT investment announcements on stock prices.

 

Keywords: Activity-based costing, cost management systems, event study methodology, information technology productivity paradox

 

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Journal Article

An Interactive and Iterative Evaluation Approach for Creating Collaborative Learning Environments  pp83-92

Anita Mirijamdotter, Mary M. Somerville, Marita Holst

© Nov 2006 Volume 9 Issue 2, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp45 - 104

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Abstract

Inspired by a three‑year Creative University 'arena' initiative at Luleå University of Technology in Sweden, an international team of faculty researchers conducted an exploratory study in 2005, which aimed to investigate the efficacy of an interactive design and evaluation process for technology‑enabled collaborative learning environments. This applied research approach was designed as a collaborative evaluation process for co‑creation of technology‑enabled, learning‑ focused physical and virtual 'learning commons.' Faculty researchers from Sweden and the United States used Soft Systems Methodology tools, including the Process for Organisational Meanings (POM) model, to guide sixty‑two students' participatory co‑design and evaluation activities. In this paper, the POM evaluation model is explained and related to the Japanese concept Ba. Application of the models is illustrated within the context of student learning through boundary crossing information exchange and knowledge creation. As evidenced in their iterative and interactive evaluative recommendations, students' learning outcomes included development of improved capabilities for identifying socio‑technical elements of distributed learning environments, suggesting that student beneficiaries can successfully reflect upon their experiences and provide valuable evaluation insights. In addition, when this evaluation is iterative, students' insights into project management, software needs, and services design can improve their technology‑enabled learning experiences. Concluding comments explore the efficacy of the POM model implementation for guiding other learning‑focused, user‑centric initiatives, which aim to promote interdisciplinary, or boundary crossing, exchanges concurrent with advancing team‑based knowledge creation proficiencies among project participants.

 

Keywords: interactive formative evaluation, learning commons, soft systems methodology, process for organisational meanings, POM, model, Ba, higher education pedagogy

 

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Journal Article

Theory, Method and Tools for Evaluation Using a Systems‑based Approach  pp139-154

Päivi Jokela, Peter Karlsudd, Martin Östlund

© Nov 2008 Volume 11 Issue 3, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp109 - 212

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Abstract

This work introduces an evaluation model for examining organisations that in one form or another depend on modern information technology for their core activities. The evaluation model, named SUV, is based on a systems science approach and has been developed at the eHealth Institute (eHälsoinstitutet) at the University of Kalmar. The central mechanism of the model, the SUV diagram, partitions the scope of evaluation into seven categories and three levels. The seven categories have been selected on a systems science basis with inspiration from systems thinking. The rationale for making this the starting point for the evaluation model is that it may be justifiably stated that the framework provided by systems thinking truly encompasses the breadth of human activity. Making use of this general framework, the SUV diagram provides a general roadmap to guide the evaluation effort. The three levels (organisation, technological and individual) were selected to add detail to the analysis complement the categories and enrich the analysis of each category as well as to the dynamic interplay among them. The SUV methodology is based on a continuous evaluation process whose driving‑force is the wish of the interested parties to develop their own activities. It is a methodology within whose framework any and all methods for data gathering deemed appropriate for the evaluation at hand can be used. The use of multiple methods is explicitly encouraged for the purpose of gaining a multi‑perspective view of the organisationactivity under scrutiny. Based on the accumulated findings from pilot studies, the model was operationalised in the form of an IT application for electronic surveys. The application is expected to contribute in making the evaluation process more efficient and add structure to this process.

 

Keywords: systems science, systems thinking, evaluation methodology, multi-method, electronic surveys

 

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Journal Article

A Case Study of SME Web Application Development Effectiveness via Agile Methods  pp13-26

Peter Clutterbuck, Terry Rowlands, Owen Seamons

© Jan 2009 Volume 12 Issue 1, ECIME 2008, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 118

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Abstract

The development of Web applications is an important focus of the modern information enabled organization — whether the Web application development is in‑house, outsourced, or purchased as 'commercial‑off‑the‑shelf' (COTS) software. Traditionally Web application development has been delivered via the dominant waterfall system. The waterfall system relies upon well‑defined governance structures, linear phases, gating, and extensive reporting and sign‑off documentation. An increasing number of development stakeholders criticise the waterfall system for web application development. The criticisms include a disproportionate focus on governance and process at the direct expense of flexibility and, most importantly, reduced productivity. One consequence of these criticisms is the increasing adoption of Web application development via agile‑system methods. This agile‑system approach centres upon smaller design teams, fewer development phases, and shorter development time tables. This case study examines the implementation of the agile‑system approach as used by a Small‑to‑Medium Enterprise (SME) software developer. The case study data collection involves interviews and observations across three different SME sources: project managers, Web application programmers, and customers. The case study analysis synthesises the experiences of these managers, programmers and customers to produce an overall assessment of the usefulness of Web application delivery via agile‑system methods. The major conclusions from the case study are that a 'default' agile‑system approach may be tailored or fine‑tuned to fit an individual developer's software process. This tailoring is based upon the developer's assessment of best practice from the overall agile‑system methodology. This tailoring, however, delivers a software development process that exhibits efficiencies and risks. The efficiencies include a more fulfilling role for each development team member, greater richness and continuity in design, a simple management system that delivers key information on a timely basis to all stake‑holders, and increased business and technical quality within the delivered application, and a relatively low cost for actioning changes to user requirements. The risks pivot upon experience levels, skills levels, and the quality of interaction within — and between ‑ both the development team and customer organization.

 

Keywords: project management, information systems management, methodology, agile-system

 

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Journal Article

Evaluating Enterprise Systems Implementation Methodologies in Action: Focusing Formalised and Situational Aspects  pp83-90

Daniela Mihailescu, Sven A. Carlsson, Marius Mihailescu

© Jan 2007 Volume 10 Issue 1, ECITE 2006 Special, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 122

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Abstract

Enterprise Systems (ES) are often the largest and most important Information Systems (IS) an organisation employs. Most ES are rented or bought as COTS (Commercial Off The Shelf) software. The use of COTS leads to a distinction between the development of the ES software—done by ES software providers, like SAP and Microsoft—and the implementation of ES software in a specific organisation. Implementation of ES are often associated with problems like higher implementation cost and longer implementation process than anticipated. To improve ES implementation, ES providers increasingly support their ES software by, in part computer‑based, implementation methodologies. The paper present an ES implementation evaluation framework called ES Implementation Methodology‑in‑Action. The framework integrates two complementary views: 1) a technology view, focusing on the formalised aspects as expressed in the ES implementation methodology (the content of the methodology), and 2) a structural view, focusing situational aspects as expressed by the implementers (the users of the implementation methodology) including implementers, implementation context, ES software and other individuals participating in the implementation project. Using document studies and interviews with implementers we show how the framework can be used to evaluate ES implementation methodologies. We evaluate one well‑known ES implementation methodology: SAP's ASAP.

 

Keywords: Enterprise Systems Implementation Methodology, Evaluation Framework, Implementation Methodology in Action, Methodology Evaluation

 

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Journal Article

Mitigating the Impact of Software Test Constraints on Software Testing Effectiveness  pp254-270

Grafton Whyte, Donovan Lindsay Mulder

© Sep 2011 Volume 14 Issue 2, ICIME 2011, Editor: Ken Grant, pp167 - 281

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Abstract

Software testing is the one of the primary methods used in the validation and verification of output in the software development industry. It is seen as a key method for achieving software quality, reliability, fitness for purpose and customer satisfaction. Software testing is however an expensive process accounting for as much as 50% of the cost of developing software based systems. In recent years, software testing as a discipline has come under pressure due to time, cost and skills constraints. These constraints impact negatively upon software test effectiveness. Therefore it is critical to identify and implement test tools that reduce the negative impact of software test constraints on software test effectiveness. In this paper the researchers examines some of the most popular software testing tools such as test case prioritisation, test suite reduction and test selection criteria, to identify: Which individual test tools are most likely to yield optimal test effectiveness and, Which combination of test tools is most likely to yield optimal test effectiveness and mitigate the effect of test constraints An extensive review of the software testing literature was conducted and used to construct a survey instrument as the basis for examining the impact of test constraints on software test methodology. The survey was issued to expert software test practitioners from various locations globally; the sample consisted of 43 test cases. The main findings were that no one approach to testing would yield satisfactory results but a combination of two or more test types from Automated testing, Smoke testing, Test case prioritisation and Regression test selection could yield effective software testing results and mitigate the effects of test constraints.

 

Keywords: software test tools, software test effectiveness, software test constraints, test selection methodology, test case selection criteria

 

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Journal Article

A Delphi Examination of Inhibitors of The Effective use of Process Industry Enterprise Resource Planning (Erp) Systems: A Case Study of New Zealands Process Industry  pp116-133

Chidi Gerard Ononiwu

© Nov 2013 Volume 16 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp86 - 161

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Abstract

Abstract: An ERP System is among the core information system (IS) software being adopted in the process industries globally. Such systems are claimed to offer strategic and operational improvement to firms supply chain effectiveness. Prior studies have shown that most adopting firms are not achieving the strategic business value identified in the project justification due to employees ineffective use of the system. The gains that such firms have achieved by implementing ERP systems in terms of increas e in operational efficiency are often accompanied by daunting ineffective usability problems. Building on Technology…Organization…Environment (TOE) theory, Task‑Technology Fit (TTF) theory and the theory of usage inhibition, this study examines the in hibitors of the effective use of ERP systems. The study used the Delphi technique to draw from the experiences of a few ERP adopters from New Zealands process industries. Findings suggest that non‑collaborative training among employees, low absorptive ca pacity and system misfit are the top most critical inhibitors. Others inhibitors include inadequate ERP expertise, ERP default attributes, lack of continuous improvement and poor vendors support. The theoretical and practical implications of these findin gs are discussed in the concluding section.

 

Keywords: Keyword: Enterprise resource planning system, Effective use, Delphi methodology, Process

 

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Journal Article

The Conditions of Complex Innovation Adoption Occurrence „ A Critical Realist Perspective  pp220-230

Marius Mihailescu, Daniela Mihailescu, Sven Carlsson

© Oct 2013 Volume 16 Issue 3, ICIME 2013, Editor: Nelson Leung, pp161 - 254

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Abstract

Abstract: The adoption of innovation is a multifaceted and dynamic phenomenon. It occurs as a result of the interplay between structural influences and agents activities. Although existing studies on innovation have recognised the importance of theories that link the structure, the macro level, and agency, the micro level, in explaining changes over time, few theoretical accounts support the integrations of multiple levels of analysis. The purpose of this paper is to develop an explanatory framework base d on a realist social theory and underpinned by a critical realist perspective, with the intention of describing and explaining IS/IT adoption occurrences. The potential of the framework is empirically illustrated with a case study that examines the adopt ion of one Enterprise Systems Implementation Methodology by implementers in an implementation context. Our qualitative study provides explanatory insights and a rich description of a particular type of complex innovation. Four theoretically and empiricall y grounded modes of adopting an implementation methodology are identified: fragmented, aggregated, integrated and infrastructural. Using the framework allow us to achieve four things. First, the framework will support the researchers in identifying partic ular configurations and the pattern of events caused by them. Second, it will take into account the embeddedness of innovations that have occurred within broader structural configurations. Third, it will allow the researchers to distinguish the different stances agents might adopt toward particular innovations and structural configurations. Fourth, the researchers will be able to identify variations that have occurred in the adoption of innovations. This study offers a foundation for future work that may contribute to a more coherent view on complex innovations and insights into their potential adoption; as such, the findings presented here can provide guidance for practitioners who seek to adopt complex IS/IT innovations.

 

Keywords: Keywords: IS/IT adoption occurrence, enterprise systems implementation methodology, realist social theory, critical realism, morphogenetic approach, modes of reflexivity

 

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