The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

Evaluating e‑Commerce Success — A Case Study  pp15-26

Shaun Pather, Dan Remenyi, Andre de la Harpe

© May 2006 Volume 9 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 43

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Abstract

The business community in the past decade has been characterised by debate over the value or effectiveness of e‑Commerce and how this type of technology needs to be implemented. During this period the business world has witnessed many examples of failures of Internet based business. There is little doubt that the high failure rate in Dot.Coms had much to do with misconceptions regarding the ease with which e‑Commerce could be implemented. Unrealistic expectations caused tried and tested business rules to be abandoned as hyperbole over took sound business sense. Although it is clear today that the Internet and the Web can facilitate business processes to add value to organisations, this technology has to be managed with considerable care. This paper reports on a case study conducted in kalahari.net, a well known South African e‑Tailing business. This case study highlights several valuable lessons to do with the evaluation of an e‑Commerce investment and how to ensure its success. Specifically the case study closely examines aspects of kalahari.net's IS management policy, and identifies a set of preliminary e‑Commerce success dimensions.

 

Keywords: e-Business, e-Commerce, Internet business, web-facilitated business, Information Systems Management, business evaluation, IS success

 

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Journal Article

A Case Study of SME Web Application Development Effectiveness via Agile Methods  pp13-26

Peter Clutterbuck, Terry Rowlands, Owen Seamons

© Jan 2009 Volume 12 Issue 1, ECIME 2008, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 118

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Abstract

The development of Web applications is an important focus of the modern information enabled organization — whether the Web application development is in‑house, outsourced, or purchased as 'commercial‑off‑the‑shelf' (COTS) software. Traditionally Web application development has been delivered via the dominant waterfall system. The waterfall system relies upon well‑defined governance structures, linear phases, gating, and extensive reporting and sign‑off documentation. An increasing number of development stakeholders criticise the waterfall system for web application development. The criticisms include a disproportionate focus on governance and process at the direct expense of flexibility and, most importantly, reduced productivity. One consequence of these criticisms is the increasing adoption of Web application development via agile‑system methods. This agile‑system approach centres upon smaller design teams, fewer development phases, and shorter development time tables. This case study examines the implementation of the agile‑system approach as used by a Small‑to‑Medium Enterprise (SME) software developer. The case study data collection involves interviews and observations across three different SME sources: project managers, Web application programmers, and customers. The case study analysis synthesises the experiences of these managers, programmers and customers to produce an overall assessment of the usefulness of Web application delivery via agile‑system methods. The major conclusions from the case study are that a 'default' agile‑system approach may be tailored or fine‑tuned to fit an individual developer's software process. This tailoring is based upon the developer's assessment of best practice from the overall agile‑system methodology. This tailoring, however, delivers a software development process that exhibits efficiencies and risks. The efficiencies include a more fulfilling role for each development team member, greater richness and continuity in design, a simple management system that delivers key information on a timely basis to all stake‑holders, and increased business and technical quality within the delivered application, and a relatively low cost for actioning changes to user requirements. The risks pivot upon experience levels, skills levels, and the quality of interaction within — and between ‑ both the development team and customer organization.

 

Keywords: project management, information systems management, methodology, agile-system

 

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Journal Article

Exception‑Based Approach for Information Systems Evaluation: The Method and its Benefits to Information Systems Management  pp51-60

Heikki Saastamoinen

© Jan 2005 Volume 8 Issue 1, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp1 - 80

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Abstract

Exceptions are events that cannot be handled by an information system by following normal processing rules. Exceptions arise for two main reasons: flaws in system design and post implementation changes in the system domain. Only few exceptions should arise in an information system serving its user community well. In practice, this is rarely the case and exceptions are sometimes rather common even with routine processes. In this paper, an exception‑based approach to evaluate information systems is presented together with practical examples of its use. The benefits of the analysis to information system management are elaborated on.

 

Keywords: Information Systems Evaluation, Exception Handling, Information Systems Management

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 9 Issue 2 / Nov 2006  pp45‑104

Editor: Dan Remenyi

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Editorial

Once again we have received an interesting range of research papers from authors around the world and furthermore they continue to represent a very wide range of thought with regards to the different applications of evaluation thinking for information and communication technology. It is clear that this field has not yet produced a clear consensus as to any particular methodology and I for one believe that this is what one might loosely call a “good thing”.

Six papers have been selected by our reviewers through the process or double‑blind peer review and this has produced six very interesting and yet different papers from authors in Sweden, Spain, The Netherlands, Ireland and Greece.

I trust readers will find these pieces of research as interesting as I have.

 

Keywords: IS integration, activity-based costing, assessment, business evaluation, cost management systems, e-business, e-commerce, enterprise modelling, evaluation framework, event study methodology, information systems effectiveness, information systems management, information systems quality, information technology productivity paradox, internet business, IS success, IT investment, process capability, project portfolio, risk management, software process maturity, system analysis metrics, value-at-risk, web-facilitated business

 

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