The Electronic Journal of Information Systems Evaluation provides critical perspectives on topics relevant to Information Systems Evaluation, with an emphasis on the organisational and management implications
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Journal Article

The Value Congruence of Social Networking Services‑a New Zealand Assessement of Ethical Information Handling  pp121-132

Tony Hooper, Tyrone Evans

© Oct 2010 Volume 13 Issue 2, ICIME 2010, Editor: Shaun Pather and Corrie Uys, pp97 - 196

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Abstract

Social networking sites on the Internet have enjoyed considerable media publicity recently. Whereas conventional social interactions leave behind no record, similar social interactions performed on social networking websites, can leave behind detailed and possibly permanent records. A literature review of social networking sites and personal privacy indicates that users may be unwary when interacting with specific social networking sites and unaware of the potential consequences of interaction, or they may deliberately ignore the risks in preference for publicity and personal relationships. A content analysis was carried out to compare the terms of use and privacy statements of six social networking sites with one another. The twelve principles of the New Zealand Privacy Act of 1993 were used in the coding template because they represent the agreed national values on information handling in New Zealand. The study demonstrated significant shortcomings in the contractual relationships between the users and social networking services that could be exploited in order to misuse personally identifiable data. It highlighted the need for users and organisations to be aware of the terms of use and privacy statements to which they become contractually bound, as well as to understand what the network may do with user’s information. Particular concern related to the accuracy of the information collected and the deletion of historic data. Social networking services terms of use and privacy statements appear to be more concerned with exculpatory clauses than demonstrating a concern for user security. Because many users, especially adolescents, are more driven by peer group pressure and the behavioural conventions of their age cohort than concern for the dangers they face when posting personal information, current theory on the role of trust in online transactions is failing to explain the contemporary behavioural phenomenon of SNS use. The social responsibility implications arising from this phenomenon and the accountability of SNSs for any misuse of personally identifiable information through their websites are discussed. Some areas for further research are suggested.

 

Keywords: social networking services, value congruence, New Zealand Privact Act 1993, privacy policies, personal security, personally identifiable information

 

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Journal Article

Acceptable and Unacceptable Behaviour on Social Networking Sites: A Study of the Behavioural Norms of Youth on Facebook  pp259-268

Val Hooper, Tarika Kalidas

© Nov 2012 Volume 15 Issue 3, ICIME, Editor: Dan Remenyi, pp230 - 287

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Abstract

SNS offer many benefits, especially for the youth who are striving to establish their identity as young adults. The youth are the most active users of SNS but are also the biggest perpetrators of behaviour that would not be tolerated offline. Although differences between these two environments have been identified, the link between the underlying behavioural norms and what is regarded as acceptable and unacceptable behaviour online has not been comprehensively explored – even less so how that behaviour is determined. Given the gap in the knowledge and the prevalence of use by the youth, the objectives of this research were to determine: (1) what behaviour is regarded as acceptable/unacceptable on SNS, (2) how that is determined, and (3) whether there are differences between online behavioural norms and those that apply to offline behaviour. Guided by social cognitive theory, qualitative interviews were conducted with 16 youth aged 18‑20 years who had Facebook accounts. Findings indicate there is greater clarity on what is unacceptable behaviour than what is acceptable. Personal behavioural norms appear to guide determination of unacceptable behaviour whereas the lead of others’ indicates acceptable behaviour. Acceptable behaviour appears to be more audience dependent than unacceptable behaviour, and there sre strong indications of herding behaviour with regard to determination of acceptable norms. The lack of clarity regarding acceptable online behavioural norms is distinctly different from the offline environment. The “protection” that the computer screen provides also contributes to the differences between offline and online behaviour. The distinction between types of friends that exists offline is emphasized online because users usually have one Facebook page that serves all audiences as opposed to encountering different groups separately as is the case offline. Online there is also the obligation to befriend people one normally would avoid offline.

 

Keywords: Keywords/Phrases: Social networking sites, behavioural norms, youth, herding behaviour, mimetic theory, Facebook

 

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Journal Article

Management Research on Social Networking Sites: State of the Art and Further Avenues of Research  pp128-141

Marwa Mallouli, Zouhour Smaoui Hachicha, Jamil Chaabouni

© Nov 2017 Volume 20 Issue 2, Editor: Shaun Pather, pp59 - 147

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Abstract

This study presents an analysis of the body of research on Social Networking Sites (SNS), in the context of management sciences from 2009 to 2014. This review identifies and analyzes 100 papers related to SNS. The purpose of this study is to clarify, in a first step, the term Social Networking Sites, and to present, in a second step, the main categories of current research themes in management sciences. To highlight topics on SNS, a content analysis was made using "NVivo 10" software. The unit of analysis was the paper summary. The 100 articles found are classified according to nine thematic categories: "SNS itself", "motivations of use", "human resources management", "knowledge management", "operational marketing", "consumer behavior", "performance", "leadership", and "innovation". The extensive review of the published SNS studies identifies 45 papers that used quantitative method. The survey was the most frequently used data‑collection technique. The researchers examine SNS by referring to theories such as social networks theory, planned behavior theory, use and gratification theory, and adoption of innovation theory. Concerning geographic distribution, the majority of work focuses on the United States. The main contribution of this paper is to build a mapping of the SNS research, to offer a reliable, constructed, practical, and useful resource. This study summarizes the methodological preferences and thematic patterns of recent SNS research in management sciences, and concludes that the SNS domain is structured according to several coherent thematic areas, and has rich potential for future research. This review proposes to provide a source for anyone interested in discovering research trends in SNS literature.

 

Keywords: Social Networking Sites, Online Social Networking, Facebook, MySpace, Firm, Organization

 

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Journal Article

Empirically Analysing Factors Influencing Users’ Adoption of Online Information Services (OISs): A Case of a Travel Business In Taiwan  pp38-53

David Corkindale, Howard Chen, Jiwat Ram

© Mar 2019 Volume 22 Issue 1, Editor: Prof Shaun Pather, pp1 - 64

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Abstract

Abstract: Online Information Services (OISs) have become an important medium for meeting the information needs of consumers for e‑commerce purposes. Yet, there is little existing research that has investigated the factors which govern users’ intentions to adopt OISs. The study addresses this gap. Data collected from 511 users of a travel company OIS in Taiwan through a cross‑sectional survey were analysed using the Structural Equation Modelling technique. It was found that: (a) subjective norms manifested through social influences, information sharing and word‑of‑mouth directly influence the Behavioural Intention (BI) to adopt and, (b) social interaction in the form of ‘networking’ among users is not associated with the BI or with the Trust of the service provider to adopt OIS. The results extend earlier research by showing that social media interactions underpinned by subjective norms are significant in influencing adoption behaviours. Evidence is provided that people’s behaviours are shaped by how they will be perceived by people they trust ‑ or wish to be aligned with. Therefore, subjective norms should be viewed from users’ networks perspective, rather than broad societal context. Managers need to focus on social networks made up of people with close alignments and common interests, where people look to each other to maintain a level of positive perception and trust. Simply focussing on social networks composed of loose relationships may neither lead to trust nor affect the behavioural intentions of users. The work offers empirical evidence of the design factors that can encourage OISs adoption.

 

Keywords: Online information services (OISs), Web 2.0, Peer-to-Peer, Online audience behaviour, Networking

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 13 Issue 2, ICIME 2010 / Oct 2010  pp97‑196

Editor: Shaun Pather, Corrie Uys

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Editorial

We have pleasure in presenting this special issue of EJISE.  As Information and Communications Technologies and the related Information Systems become ever more pervasive across all spheres of business, government and community based organizations, the scope of this journal has flexed to accommodate these varied settings in which pertinent research problems are located.   Consequently, in this special issue wide‑ranging problems related to the broad ambit of IS evaluation is reported on: 

As many countries continue to develop policies to enhance and sustain the growth of the SME sector, so too does the expenditure and consumption of IT amongst this category of business grow at an ever increasing rate thus warranting the attention of evaluation research. Avraam Papastathopoulos and Christina Beneki investigate an important concern with regards to the factors which are associated with the benefits from the adoption of ICTs amongst SMEs. In a study of the Greek SME sector the paper provides evidence that strategy plays a major role in the adoption and the appropriate use of ICTs.  Importantly their research also finds that prior entrepreneurial experience‑knowledge of ICT is significantly associated with the ICT performance. 

RFID technologies are increasingly used in a number of organisational settings for inventory control and management. Paul Golding and Vanesa Tennant contribute to our understanding of evaluation by proposing a methodology to evaluate the RFID inventory reader in a library.  Whilst the findings of this paper hone in on the application of RFID in a specific environment, the findings provide a basis for which evaluation of RFID in other similar contexts can take place, and thus adds to the conceptual base on RFID performance testing.

Notwithstanding many years of case studies and an increasing body of literature on ERP implementation and evaluation thereof questions continue to arise in respect of successful outcomes.  Brian O’Donovan and his co‑authors argue that during the ERP usage stage the intended efficiencies from ERP systems are not always realised. Having studied organisational memory mismatches and the resultant coping strategies their research posits that mismatches and short‑term coping strategies were found to contribute to ERP underperformance. 

In their paper Peter Weimann and co authors investigate the role of communications culture in a distributed team environment.  In assessing the role of ICTs in such an environment the paper argues that team member satisfaction and team success can only be accomplished if the communication culture in the company takes into account the technologies used and the distributed work setting. 

From amongst the various IS evaluation approaches, those apporaches which focus on the role of human stakeholders  are  worthy of a deeper understanding. Jeffrey Bagraim examines the multiple commitments of information technology knowledge workers and the related outcomes of such commitment. The results of his study challenges managers to review their assumptions about the organizational commitments of information technology knowledge workers.

Web 2.0 applications also receive attention in this issue.  Hooper and Evans investigate the value congruence of social networking services in New Zealand, and make an assessment of ethical information handling.  Their findings demonstrate significant shortcomings in the contractual relationships between the users and social networking services and they argue that this could be exploited in order to misuse personally identifiable data.

The paper by Racheal Lindsay and co‑authors discusses measures which are used to monitor data quality in the context of mobile devices in the UK police force.  Their findings show that whilst there are processes in place to verify data standards, these processes only take into consideration the structural completeness of data, and not other measurements of data quality, such as accuracy, timeliness, relevance, understandability and consistency.

Robbert in't Hout and coauthors studied how a wiki could be used to improve knowledge sharing.  The paper reports on a case study in which a consulting company was able to improve knowledge sharing amongst consultants during the devleopment of a Municipal Traffic and Transport Plan.  The findings  suggest that wikis need to be tuned to the learning styles that are available within the community that will use the tool.  In the context of knowledge sharing impolrtant lessons for wiki design are offered.

Finally, in a study of e‑government adoption, Rangarirai Matavire and co‑authors report on factors which inhibit the successful implementation of e‑government in South Africa. The findings of their research demonstrate that leadership, project fragmentation, perceived value of Information Technology, citizen inclusion and task co‑ordination are among the key inhibitors of e‑government success.

Shaun Pather and Corrie Uys

South Africa, October 2010

 

Keywords: affective commitment, boosting behaviour, communication culture, communication pattern, communication technology, data quality, e-Government, enterprise systems, entrepreneurial experience, ERP customising, ERP systems, ERP training, ERP usage, evaluation, grounded theory, helping behaviour, ICT-adoption, ICT-performance, ICT-strategy, interface design , knowledge management , law enforcement, library, mobile working, Municipal Traffic and Transport Planning, New Zealand Privacy Act 1993, ordinal regression, organisational memory, performance , personal security, personally identifiable information, privacy policies, RFID, social networking services , social software, South Africa, turnover intentions, value congruence, virtual teams, Wiki

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 20 Issue 2 / Nov 2017  pp59‑147

Editor: Shaun Pather

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Editorial

 

Keywords: information quality, system quality, service quality, satisfaction, high information intensity, banking sector, E-Supply Chain Coordination, SME Performance, Technology-Organization-Environment Framework, Resource-based View of the Firms, health information systems, information systems integration, interoperability, E-commerce, Jordan, Awareness, Payment, Partial Awareness, Full Awareness, Awareness of Products, Services, Awareness of Brand, Awareness of Delivery, E-commerce processes, Awareness evaluation, attitude certainty, processing fluency, web evaluation, online data collection, tool design, instrument, Networking Sites, Online Social Networking, Facebook, MySpace, Firm, Organization

 

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Journal Issue

Volume 22 Issue 1 / Mar 2019  pp1‑64

Editor: Prof Shaun Pather

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Keywords: Mobility, BYOD, mobile computing, risk considerations, risk management, security, Sustainability Metrics, Impact Assessment Studies e-Governance, ERP, Enterprise Resource Planning, Evaluation, Context, Lifecycle, Interpretive, ERP, Enterprise Resource Planning, Evaluation, Context, Lifecycle, Interpretive, Online information services (OISs), Web 2.0, Peer-to-Peer, Online audience behaviour, Networking, Evaluation, design science, customer satisfaction, E-Government, theoretical framework, qualitative

 

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